Lower Abdominal Ultrasound
Rejuvence
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Rejuvence
4.7
powered by Google

For interest free credit with ZIP please call us on 0207 531 6600

A lower abdominal ultrasound is performed to have a look at the groins, common iliac and femoral arteries and veins as well as a general look at the bowel and bladder.

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Common conditions

A lower abdominal ultrasound scan is useful in evaluating the following conditions:

  • What are Hernias?
    A hernia is defined as when a tissue, such as part of the intestine bulges through a weak area of abdominal muscles. Hernias commonly occur in the tummy and are described according to their anatomical location. Inguinal hernias occur in the groin. Paraumbilical hernias occur in and around the belly button. Incisional hernias occur at the site of surgical scars. 
  • How common is it?
    Hernias are common and generally harmless.
  • Does it affect males and females?
    Hernias are up to 10 times more likely in men than women.
  • What age groups?
    Hernias tend to affect people of all ages but become more common with age.
  • What are the main symptoms?
    Patients experiencing hernias may have symptoms such as a bulge in the affected area. It will be more visible when standing straight or during coughing or straining. Other symptoms include pain, weakness, pressure or a heavy dragging sensation. Specific symptoms are associated with the different anatomical locations of hernia.
  • How is it tested for?
    Generally a hernia can be visibly diagnosed by a doctor. Further confirmation can be achieved with an ultrasound, CT or MRI scan.
  • Is there a cure?
    Yes, hernias can be repaired.
  • How is it treated?
    Hernia repairs are extremely common and normally performed through laparoscopic surgery.
  • What is Bladder Cancer?
    Bladder cancer is the growth of a tumor in the bladder lining which can, in some cases, spread to the muscles of the bladder. It is characteristically associated with azo dye use in the leather tanning industry. 
  • How common is it?
    As one of the most common cancers, bladder cancer occurs in approximately 68,000 adults in the US yearly.
  • Does it affect males and females?
    Though bladder cancer affects both men and women, it occurs most often in men.
  • What age groups?
    Anyone can develop bladder cancer at any age; however, it tends to occur more often in older adults in their late 60’s.
  • What are the main symptoms?
    The most common sign of bladder cancer is painless haematuria (blood in the urine). It can also be associated with incomplete emptying of the bladder and lower urinary tract infections.
  • How is it tested for?
    Doctors will commonly perform a cystoscopy in which a small tube is inserted into the bladder through the urethra. The bladder line is inspected and biopsies taken. Ultrasound can also help to identify bladder cancer.
  • Is there a cure?
    Bladder cancer can be completely cured through early detection and treatment.
  • How is it treated?
    Surgery can be done to remove the tumors if the conditions are favorable, however, if the bladder must be removed completely then reconstructive surgery is needed to be able to pass urine. Follow up with different forms of chemotherapy and radiotherapy may also be needed.
  • What is an Enlarged Prostate and Prostate Cancer?
    The prostate is a gland found in men located just below the bladder. Enlarged Prostate – simple enlargement of the prostate gland. Prostate Cancer – following excessive enlargement of the prostate it can become cancerous. 
  • How common is it?
    Prostate cancer is one of the highest occurring cancers in men. An enlarged prostate is also very common in men over the age of 50.
  • What age groups?
    An enlarged prostate generally occurs in men between 51 and 60 years. It occurs in upto 90% of men above the age of 80. Prostate cancer most commonly affects men over the age of 50 and of Afro-Carribean descent.
  • What are the main symptoms?
    In an Enlarged Prostate men can experience weak/slow urine flow, feelings of incomplete urination and difficulty in starting urination. There is also increased frequency and urgency of urination (needing to go more often with difficulty holding urine). The same symptoms are experienced with prostate cancer as well as blood in the urine, blood in the semen, and the onset of erectile dysfunction.
  • How is it tested for?
    A doctor may perform a digital rectal exam to check for prostatic enlargement. Urine tests can also help. Blood tests such as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test is usually the first line of investigation followed by biopsy.
  • Is there a cure?
    There are several treatment options for an enlarged prostate. For prostate cancer early detection is imperative for a good outcome.
  • How is it treated?
    Medication such as alpha-blockers to relax the prostate and bladder muscles can be used to help with passing urine. A TURP (trans-urethral resection of the prostate) can be performed to shave away part of the prostate and reduce it in size. For prostate cancer a TURP maybe sufficient. However, in more advanced cases the entire prostate may need to be removed (prostatectomy) and this is coupled with a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy.
  • What is a swollen lymph gland?
    Swollen lymph nodes usually occur as a result of infection from bacteria or viruses. Rarely, swollen lymph nodes are caused by cancer.
    Lymph glands or lymph nodes are fundamental in your body’s ability to combat infection. They essentially identify and trap bacteria and viruses as well as other causes of infection. Lymph glands are distributed throughout your body but are especially prominent in the neck, arm pits and groin.
  • How common is it?
    Swollen lymph glands are very common and predominantly occur in the presence of infection close to their location.
  • Does it affect males and females?
    Yes it affects both males and females.
  • What age groups are affected?
    It can affect all ages. Swollen lymph glands are especially common in children. Mesenteric Adenitis is a condition in children that results in widespread swollen lymph nodes in the tummy as a result of a virus and can be difficult to tell apart from appendicitis.
  • What are the main symptoms?
    They can present as a swollen hard lump or set of lumps in the groin. They can also be painful and can be associated with some redness over the skin. Very rarely they can become infected and develop into an abscess.
  • How is it tested for?
    Lymph glands in the groin can easily be identified using an ultrasound scan. They can also be identified on a CT scan.
  • Is there a cure?
    Swollen lymph glands are most commonly the result of infection , either locally or systemically. Hence treatment of the infection and it’s resolution will normally result in swelling of lymph glands improving. However, it can take some time for swollen lymph glands to go back to normal. Where swollen lymph glands persist it can, however, be a sign of other more sinister conditions such as chronic infections such as TB or even certain types of cancers including lymphoma. Persistent and painful swellings in the groin should therefore be urgently assessed and ultrasound is an excellent way to do this.
  • How is it treated?
    Unless swollen lymph glands are infected and develop into an abscess there is no specific treatment needed for this. As mentioned above, treatment of the underlying cause whether it be an infection of some sort or something else, needs to be addressed and the swelling of lymph glands in the groin and elsewhere will improve.

OUR RADIOLOGIST

Dr Ali Zaman

MBBS FRCR MPharm PGCert

All ultrasound scans at Rejuvence Medical are carried out by our Consultant Radiologist – Dr Ali Zaman. Dr Zaman graduated from Barts and The London Medical School in 2009. He has also obtained a Masters degree in Pharmacology. After completing his training in General Medicine and Surgery, he pursued specialty training in Radiology obtaining his Fellowship in Radiology (FRCR).  Dr Zaman subsequently followed this up with the prestigious European Board of Interventional Radiology Fellowship and trained as a fellow in Interventional Radiology at the Royal London Hospital.

Dr Zaman is currently a Consultant Interventional Radiologist at Mid and South Essex University Hospitals. He is an expert in ultrasound and ultrasound guided interventions, having performed thousands of such tests and procedures.

We are overwhelmed to have Dr Zaman as a member of our team at Rejuvence Medical.

Risks

Abdominal ultrasound is a safe procedure and has no known risks.

How to prepare

Ideally you should avoid food for 8 hours prior to your scan. We understand that this may of course not be very practical especially if you are coming from work. Therefore, if possible please try to skip lunch. Food in your stomach can make it difficult for the sonographer to generate clear images. The sonographer will also ask you to come with a full bladder so drink plenty and avoid passing urine immediately prior to your scan. In general you should continue to take your regular medication. 

What you can expect

Before the procedure
Before your ultrasound, you may be asked to change into a gown and to remove any jewelry. You will be asked to lie on your back.
During the procedure

Our Consultant Radiologist will perform your scan. A small amount of ultrasound gel is applied to your abdomen. The gel enables the ultrasound device to provide better images.

The radiologist will gently press an ultrasound probe against your tummy, moving it back and forth. A standard ultrasound scan takes around 20 minutes to complete. It’s usually painless. However, it is not uncommon to experience some discomfort if radiologist is required to press down on areas where you may have some pain. We always try to ensure you are comfortable at all times.

After the procedure
You will be able to return to normal activities immediately after your scan.

Results

The radiologist will prepare a written report immediately after your scan. You can wait for the written report and should you wish a copy of your scan images can be sent to you via email so you have them to hand at all times.

Follow up with Rejuvence Medical

We always recommend booking in a consultation immediately after your scan with one of our doctors to discuss the results of your scan and to provide advice regarding any further investigations and/or treatment. Further investigations and treatment can include:

  • Blood tests
  • Urine dipstick
  • Referral to a specialist (Private/NHS*)
  • Referral for further imaging (CT/MRI)

* Please note that for referrals back to NHS you will still have to go via your GP but Rejuvence Medical will provide a full report and cover letter in support of the referral.

Alternative medical providers

We are connected to NHS digital and the PACS framework. Should you wish your scan images can be sent directly to your NHS GP or hospital consultant. If you have been referred by a private medical practitioner, with your consent, your results will be securely emailed through to them.

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